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Zogby Analytics, in conjunction with Weiss Research Inc., conducted an interactive survey of 1,000 US self-identified members of the investor class--individuals with $30k or more in investable assets such as stocks, bonds, mutual funds and ETFs. When asked who they would vote for in the 2012 Presidential Election, Mr. Romney leads Mr. Obama-47.8% to 39.8%, while 12.2% are undecided.

About Weiss
Weiss Research, Inc. has a long history of providing research and analysis designed to empower investors with information and tools to make more informed, independent decisions along with an equally long history of public service.

weissinc.com

When asked how an Obama win would affect the economy, a plurality (45.9%) of investors felt an Obama re-election would have a negative impact on the economy, as opposed to 38.2% of investor class respondents who felt his re-election would have a positive effect on the economy. Only 12.4% felt it would have no effect and 3.5% were undecided. When this question is examined in the context of income, only those who earn $35-50K, believe an Obama win in November will have a positive impact on the economy, while all other income levels believe a second term from the President will have a negative impact.

When we examine the relationship between how the investor class feels about a second Obama term and their investing habits, the data show a direct correlation between how frequently the investor class trades stocks, bonds, mutual funds and ETFs versus how they view a second term as either positive or negative for the economy.

Question: How will an Obama win affect the economy?

Income
 
Extremely Negative/Negative
Extremely Positive/Positive
<25
51.7
37.3
25k-35k
36.6
34.5
35k-50k
35.1
53.2
50k-75k
46.1
41.2
75k-100k
49.9
41.6
100k+
32.9
32.9

Age
 
Extremely Negative/Negative
Extremely Positive/Positive
18-29
33.0
46.1
30-49
40.6
43.0
50-64
49.7
36.7
65+
64.5
25.7




How often do you trade stocks, ETF's or Mutual Funds
 
Extremely Negative/Negative
Extremely Positive/Positive
Every day
22.4
61.6
A few times a week
29.9
49.6
A few times a month
55.2
26.9
A few times a year
49.4
36.8
Never
49.2
38.2
Not sure
46.4
32.6




How will a Romney win affect the economy?

Overall, more investors felt a Romney win will have a positive effect on the economy. Nearly forty-eight percent (47.8%) felt Romney will have a positive effect on the economy, while slightly more than a third (33.7%) of investors are pessimistic that a Romney win will be negative for the economy.

When we look at income levels of the investor class, more investors who earn less than $25k, and between $25-35k annually, feel a Romney win will be negative, while those who earn upwards of $35k annually are more likely to view a Romney win as positive for the economy.

Every age cohort believes a Romney win will be positive for the economy, with the strongest sentiment coming from investors aged 65+ (57.6%).

With regard to the frequency with which the investor class trades stocks, bonds, mutual funds and ETFs, from everyday to never, more respondents feel a Romney win is better for the economy.

Question: How will an Romney win affect the economy?

Income
 
Extremely Negative/Negative
Extremely Positive/Positive
<25
39.6
36.1
25k-35k
34.0
32.7
35k-50k
43.8
44.8
50k-75k
25.0
59.6
75k-100k
35.2
53.4
100k+
34.6
46.0

Age
 
Extremely Negative/Negative
Extremely Positive/Positive
18-29
36.5
37.8
30-49
35.7
46.6
50-64
34.6
48.4
65+
29.6
57.6


 
How often do you trade stocks, ETF's or Mutual Funds
 
Extremely Negative/Negative
Extremely Positive/Positive
Every day
28.6
49.3
A few times a week
42.6
42.8
A few times a month
19.2
56.2
A few times a year
36.5
48.8
Never
41.5
42.7
Not sure
38.8
35.2



Survey Methodology [Zogby Analytics Interactive Investors] 9/21/12 thru 9/23/12

Using trusted interactive partner resources, thousands of adults were invited to participate in this interactive survey. Each invitation is password coded and secure so that one respondent can only access the survey one time.


Using information based on census data, CIA fact books and exit polls, we use complex weighting techniques to best represent the demographics of the population being surveyed. Weighted variables may include age, race, gender, region, party, education, and religion

Based on a confidence interval of 95%, the margin of error for 1000 is +/- 3.2 percentage points. This means that all other things being equal, the identical survey repeated will have results within the margin of error 95 times out of 100.

Subsets of the data have a larger margin of error than the whole data set. As a rule we do not rely on the validity of very small subsets of the data especially sets smaller than 50-75 respondents. At that subset we can make estimations based on the data, but in these cases the data is more qualitative than quantitative.

Additional factors can create error, such as question topics and phrasing.

About Weiss
Weiss Research, Inc. has a long history of providing research and analysis designed to empower investors with information and tools to make more informed, independent decisions along with an equally long history of public service.

weissinc.com
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