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Voters Split on Approval of Their Congressional Representative

UTICA, New York - More than half of likely voters describe their motivation or feelings about voting this year as either angry (33%) or disappointed (25%), and 49% disapprove of the job performance of their Congressional representative, a new Zogby Interactive survey finds.

The survey of 1,963 likely voters conducted from October 12 to 14 also found one-fourth of voters say they will approach voting this year feeling hopeful, and just 2% say they are pleased. While Republican and independent voters are much more likely to feel either angry or disappointed, nearly half of Democrats choose one of those two to describe their attitudes.

Compared to past elections, which of the following best describes your motivation or feelings as you think about voting next month?

Feeling

All Voters

Democrats

Republicans

Independents

Angry

33%

17%

46%

40%

Disappointed

25%

29%

17%

28%

Hopeful

25%

30%

28%

15%

Pleased

2%

3%

2%

1%

No different

than other years

10%

13%

5%

12%

None of these/

Not sure

5%

8%

3%

4%

Totals may not add up to 100% due to rounding.

 

Those who say they are much more likely to vote for Tea Party endorsed candidates have the highest angry percentage, 74%. Voters who say they are afraid of losing their jobs also expressed higher percentages of anger (46%).

On the question of job approval for a voter's own Congressional representative, 48% approve and 49% disapprove.

Pollster John Zogby: "Here is more evidence that voters want change. Until the economy improves, they will remain angry. If, as some fear, double-digit unemployment rates are the new norm, our electoral politics will remain quite volatile." 

The interactive poll consisted of 1,963 likely voters and has a margin of error of +/-2.2%.  A sampling of Zogby International's online panel, which is representative of the adult population of the U.S., was invited to participate.  Slight weights were added to region, party, age, race, religion, gender, and education to more accurately reflect the population.

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